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This week I’m continuing my recaps of publisher spotlights from the Romance Writers of America annual conference in New York City with a look at Pocket and Gallery Books.

The Spotlight on Pocket and Gallery Books featured videos, podcasts snippets, games and giveaways. Editorial Director Lauren McKenna, Executive Editor Adam Wilson, Executive Editor Miki Nuding and Editor Abby Ziedel presented the workshop.  Pocket and Gallery are divisions of Simon and Schuster.

Adam Wilson spoke about Gallery Books. Gallery publishes a number of best-selling authors. He spoke about these authors and their upcoming books. Gallery publishes a lot of pop-culture and celebrity non-fiction, but they also do a lot of romance, both historical and contemporary.

Lauren McKenna talked about Pocket Star, Pocket Gallery’s digital first division. They publish four to five titles a month. Each book has its own publicist and marketing plan. They do originals and reprints. They publish romance, erotica, urban fantasy, new adult and some mystery and thrillers.

Abby Ziedel talked about XOXO After Dark, Pocket’s romance website.  This includes a showroom for Pocket Star. The website encourages reader engagement with free reads and excerpts, contests, and author blogs. They also do a weekly podcast in which the editors talk romance, pop culture and anything that captures their attention. Sometimes they interview authors.

Miki Nuding talked about Pocket Books, which celebrated its 90th anniversary last year. Pocket publishes all different genres of romance. She, like the other editors, reviewed a list of Pocket authors and their new releases.

The editors spoke briefly about their wish lists.

Abby doesn’t like kids in books, but she loves dogs, cats and horses. She would love to see a story about a virus in a submarine.

Lauren loves “hot, dark, screwed-up heroes” in any genre. She likes paranormal, though it’s a hard sell these days. She loves contemporary romance.

Miki loves a really good, emotional story – especially if you can make her laugh.

Adam also loves humor. He would like to see more stories out of geek culture.

Pocket Gallery accepts agented submissions only.

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My free online read, Black Canyon Betrayal, continues this week with Chapter Two. You can read all the chapters posted to date at any time here. Black Canyon Betrayal is part of my Ranger Brigade miniseries for Harlequin Intrigue. bookbanner

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Lee and Low Books is sponsoring a New Visions Award for middle grade and young adult writers of color. First prize is $1000 and a publishing contract with Tu Books, Lee and Low’s YA and MG imprint. There is no fee to enter. Manuscripts should be appropriate for children 8 to 12 or young adults 12 to 18. The work may be in any fiction genre, but the editors are particularly interested in science fiction and fantasy. Each author may submit up to two entries. For detailed how-tos and more about Lee and Low Books, go here. The deadline for entries is October 31, 2015.

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Anderbo.com is sponsoring the RRofihe Trophy short story contest. Submit your previously unpublished short story of between 3,500 and 5,000 words by the deadline of October 15, 2015 for a chance at the $500 prize and the Rrofihe Trophy. There is no fee to enter the contest, which will be judged by multi-published short story author Rick Rofihe. For all the details go here. .

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As always, feel free to share the information in this blog with others. Repost, reprint, retweet, etc. Please give me credit as the source of the information and include a link to this blog. For more about me, visit my websites here and here, or check me out on Facebook. 

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“Loafing is the most productive part of a writer’s life.” ~James Norman Hall

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This week I’m continuing my summary of publisher spotlights from the Romance Writers of America convention, with a look at Harlequin’s Single Title program. The Spotlight on Harlequin Single Title was presented by Margaret Marbury, VP of ST editorial; Nicole Brebner, senior ed. of Mira;  Margot Lipschultz, senior editor; and Susan Swinwood, Exec. Ed. Of HQN. Each of these editors spent some time talking about the number of bestselling authors under their imprints. They also talked a lot about the editors and what Harlequin can do for authors.

Harlequin prides itself on excellent editorial. For single titles, they are very selective. They want to be able to support the book. Editors have a passion for the books they choose. “We recognize that publishing is a partnership, not a dictatorship.” Harlequin has “unmatched” distribution, according to Marbury. Harlequin books are sold world-wide, in 110 markets, in 34 languages. The books are available “where women shop.” They also have their own direct-mail bookclubs. They publish in all formats, including digital.

Ms. Brebner talked about Mira, which is Harlequin’s single title, general fiction imprint. They publish a wide variety of genres – romance, women’s fiction, historical fiction, thrillers and literary fiction. They publish mass market, trade paper, hardcover and digital. 2014 is the 20th anniversary of Mira Books. Mira publishes about 105 titles a year in all formats. Mira is looking for more contemporary women’s fiction and “a really great psychological thriller.” Margaret Marbury, who also acquires for Mira, would love to see “big, historical fiction that hasn’t been done before.”

Susan Swinwood talked about HQN. 2014 is the Tenth Anniversary of HQN. HQN focuses on single title romance. They publish approximately 80 titles a year. They publish contemporary, historical, erotic romance and romantic suspense, as well as new adult romance. They want to offer readers a wide variety of stories. HQN publishes in mass market and digital, but is also expanding into trade paper. Swinwood noted that romances that tend toward women’s fiction – “layered, modern love stories” – do best in trade paper. These are emotional, more sophisticated books. HQN is looking for new authors who can write these kinds of books.  In general, HQN is looking for “breakout editorial” and would like some new voices and stories they haven’t seen. They aren’t looking to copy their existing authors. They’d be interested in more suspense or romantic suspense.

Margot Lipschultz talked about YA Fiction under Harlequin Teen. Harlequin Teen is five years old in 2014. They launched in 2009 with four titles. They now publish app. 40 titles a year. They publish commercial young adult fiction, primarily in hardcover and trade paper, as well as digital. Their books are targeted to girls 13 to 18, but the readership extends far beyond that. The books are primarily 60,000 to 90,000 words. The editors who primarily acquire for Harlequin Teen are Natashya Wilson and T.S. Ferguson. They are constantly surveying teen readers about what they want to read. They have a Harlequin Teen panel that they consult for ideas and feedback. Harlequin Teen publishes contemporary, fantasy, paranormal and historical. The stories may include romance, but they don’t have to. They’re interested in YA mystery – Margot would love something in this vein “snarky, like Veronica Mars.” She also acquires for HQN and there she would love to see a contemporary romance set outside the United States.

All of Harlequin’s Single Title lines take agented submissions only. The exceptions would be if you already write for Harlequin and submit through your Harlequin editor, or if you pitch to an editor at conference and she/he asks for your submission.

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TheMountainBetweenUsLook for the mass market paperback release of The Mountain Between Us at a WalMart near you. With a new cover and a new low price, The Mountain Between Us takes readers along as the folks in Eureka, Colorado, prepare for the holidays under sometimes trying circumstances.  This book was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award this year.

“Fans of small town romances will enjoy visiting Eureka and its eccentric residents.” Library Journal

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Literary Wanderlust is a new digital and print publishing company devoted to genre fiction. Publisher Susie Brooks seeks to “bridge the gap between traditional and self-publishing” with this new venture. She is accepting submissions of romance, erotica, science fiction, fantasy, horror, thriller, and mystery. She is open to all sub-genres within these genres.  Find more details here. 

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As always, feel free to share this information with others. All I ask is that you credit me as the source and provide a link to this blog. If you want to know more about me and my books, check out my websites here or here and like me on Facebook here. 

 

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
– Edgar Rice Burroughs

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This week I’m continuing my look at publisher spotlights from the RWA National Convention in San Antonio, with Loose Id books. The Spotlight on Loose Id was presented by editor-in-chief Treva Harte and marketing and information officer Allie McKnight. Loose Id (pronounced Lucid) is a digital first company. They have been in business for ten years and have been profitable for all of that time.

Loose Id publishes primarily erotic romance. They don’t mean erotica – they want hot and sensual books with explicit sex scenes, but the conflict arises from character and there is a romantic arc to the story. Sex is important to the story, but it doesn’t have to be kink. Kink works in some stories, but what Harte is looking for is sex that’s important to the stories and important to the characters. Every story should have a definite romance hook.

Under the banner of erotic romance, Loose Id publishes a variety of stories – both heterosexual and GLBT romances. They welcome historical and contemporary stories, paranormal, fantasy, mystery and science fiction under that erotic romance umbrella.

They publish stories 20,000 to 120,000 words. Stories 55,000 to 70,000 words receive an advance and are eligible to print as well as e-release.  They pay 40% royalties (on gross sales) and retain electronic rights for three years.

Harte talked about the submission process. They sometimes ask for revisions from authors before they agree to buy the manuscript. They provide an assessment letter, which points out strengths and weaknesses, with the goal of helping authors to improve. They offer talks and online classes to help educate and inform authors. And they have an author development program, where an editor works with an author to improve a promising story.

Right now, they’ve issued some special calls for upcoming anthologies:

Christmas Menage – 20,000 to 30,000 word Christmas-theme manage stories, XXX rated. Deadline – Oct. 15.

Baby, What a Big Surprise! – Holiday novellas – any holiday between December and March, 20,000 to 35,000 words. The deadline for Christmas stories is past, but they’re still open to holidays after the new year.

Find all of Loose Id’s submission guidelines, contract terms, etc. here. 

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Liz McMullen Show Publications is assembling a Valentine’s anthology on the theme of “appetite.” Send your 3,000 to 4,000 word short story on this theme — any genre, although Editor Ila Goyane prefers that all stories have some element of romance or erotica. Payment is $30 plus two copies. The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2015. Get all the details here.

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Young adult magazine Cicada has issued a call for stories, poems and comics on the theme of Tricksters and Thieves. Send your stories of pirates, charlatans, illusions, deceptions and trickery to editor Marianne Carus. Stories may be up to 9,000 words. Payment is 25 cents a word.  The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2104. Find more details here.

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New York based small press Black Balloon Publishing offers the Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize for an unpublished novel of 50,000 words or more. The novel may be of any genre, and they welcome cross-genre and hard-to-define fiction. First prize is $5,000 and a publication contract. There is no fee to enter. They will accept submissions beginning October 1 to October 31. Find more details here.

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As always, feel free to share this information with others. All I ask is that you credit me as the source and provide a link to this blog. If you want to know more about me and my books, check out my websites here or here and like me on Facebook here. 

 

“You could compile the worst book in the world entirely out of selected passages from the best writers in the world.” ~G.K. Chesterton

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This week I’m continuing my look at the publisher spotlights from the RWA National Convention with a look at Sourcebooks. The Spotlight on Sourcebooks was presented by Editorial Director Deb Werksman, Editor Mary Altman, Assistant Editor Kat Clyne and publisher Dominique Racca. Sourcebooks is a general trade publishing house. They publish 350 new titles a year, about half of that is fiction. They publish 8 to 10 romances a month. They are the largest woman-owned, independent publishing house in the country. They are based in Napierville, Illinois, with satellite offices in New York and in Milford, CT. Sourcebooks Casablanca is their fiction and non-fiction romance imprint.  Sourcebooks Fire is their YA list, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky is for children’s books and Sourcebooks Landmark is general fiction.

Both women sent some time talking about how Sourcebooks targets different markets, from mass-retailers such as WalMart and Target, to schools and libraries. Marketing is determined on a book-by-book basis. They produce books as both paperbacks and e-books. They send ARCs to reviewers.

The editors are looking for heroines the reader can relate to, a hero the reader could fall in love with, a world the reader can escape into, and a compelling hook that makes readers immediately want to read books. They love it if the author has ideas for a series. Manuscripts should be 90,000 to 120,000 words. They publish single-title romance in all sub-genres. The editor and author work together to plan future books and a career trajectory.

They talked about some of what they are looking for. In paranormal: shape shifters are popular. Vampires remain popular, but it is very difficult for a new author to break out with a new vampire story. In paranormal, world-building is of utmost important. The reader wants to visit that new world. They also like romance suspense/paranormal mixes.

In erotic romance, the love story and the sex really needs to balance out. The love story must be really engaging, as well as the sex being really hot. Deb thinks BDSM is a “bit overdone” right now. She also likes very sexy romances that aren’t necessarily erotica.  Mary said that when she acquires erotic romance, she looks for a very strong hook that will make the story stand out in a crowded field. Every sexual encounter needs to be vital to the story.

Sourcebooks is eager to acquire more YA. Sales are very strong in YA for them. They do well with contemporary YA thrillers and YA paranormal. They also like YA non-fiction.

In historical, the eras that sell best for them are Regency, Victorian, Edwardian and Georgian England. Anything Scottish sells. Time travel does well for them. They’re also publishing medieval. They also have a strong historical western romance program. They don’t publish stories set in the American revolution, Civil War, or anything after 1900.

They publish women’s fiction, both with and without romantic elements. Deb wants women’s fiction with a strong romantic element; Editor Shana Drehs prefers darker, more issue-driven women’s fiction.

The next section of the Spotlight was a bit unusual – several authors took the microphone to give testimonials about how much they love working with Sourcebooks.

You can learn about everything Sourcebooks is looking for, all the editors at Sourcebooks, their likes and dislikes here. You can find their romance submission guidelines here.Sourcebooks’ romance editors do accept both agented and unagented manuscripts.

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For a limited time, the ebook version of my Harlequin Intrigue, Rocky Mountain Rescue, is

9780373697496

on sale for $2.99 (regularly $4.99) Pick up a copy for Kindle here, for Nook here, or check your favorite ebook dealer.

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Bundoran Press is seeking science fiction stories for a new anthology, Second Contacts. All stories should be set fifty years after humans’ first contact with aliens. Stories should be between 3,500 and 6,500 words. Payment is 2 cents a word, up to $130 Canadian dollars. The deadline for submissions is January 15, 2015. Find all the submission details here. 

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Crimson Romance is seeking novellas (10,000 to 20,000 words) for a Valentine anthology to  be released in February 2015. Stories may be sweet to spicy, though the editors cite a preference for  more sensual stories. The deadline for submissions is Octoer 15, 2014. See the guidelines here.

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Want to learn all the latest book news from me? Like my Facebook author page here.  Or visit one of my websites, here or here. 

As always, feel free to share the information in this newsletter with others. Please give me credit as the source, and includ ea link to this blog. Thanks!

 

 

Writing means sharing. It’s part of the human condition to want to share things – thoughts, ideas, opinions.

Paulo Coelho

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This week I’m continuing my summary of the publisher spotlights from the RWA National Convention with a look at Grand Central Publishing.

The Spotlight on Grand Central Publishing was presented by Leah Hultenschmidt, Editorial Director of Forever and Senior Editor Michelle Bidelspach.

The Hachette Book Group is the parent company of Grand Central. Forever is the romance arm of Grand Central. Hachette is a very large company with many different imprints. Leah presented this as an advantage, because they have the clout of a large company behind them. Hachette has many best-selling authors in its ranks.

Forever publishes six to eight mass market romances a month. Forever Yours, its digital-first romance imprint, releases four to eight titles each month. “The growth of romance is a company-wide initiative,” said Hultenschmidt, who came to Grand Central after stints with Dorchester and Sourcebooks.

Michelle talked about what the editors are looking for and how to submit. Forever is single-title – both print and e-books. They are looking for “everything” – contemporary, historical, romantic suspense, new adult, erotic romance, paranormal romance. They publish some of their authors e-first and follow with print later.

The editors are looking for 85,000 to 95,000 words, agented manuscripts only. But there are some exceptions to the agented-only rule: if a Grand Central editor judges a contest and asks to see your work or if you pitch at a conference and the editor asks for your manuscript, you don’t have to be agented. In these cases, send your complete manuscript. They will also consider query letters from unagented authors.

Only submit to one editor. If the project isn’t right for that editor, she will pass it on if she feels another Grand Central editor would be interested in it.

All Forever authors receive an advance against royalties.

The Forever Yours imprint is digital first. Authors published in Forever Yours do not receive an advance, but have escalating royalties. They publish novellas, 8,000 to 35,000 words and novels, 35,000 to 100,000 words. They also publish all kinds of romance – sassy, sweet, sexy. The only things they don’t publish are young adult, straight mystery, general fiction or non-fiction or poetry. They accept both unagented and agented manuscripts.

To submit to Forever Yours, send a query that includes your genre, your word count and a brief pitch, a synopsis, and the full manuscript.

Leah then took the mike again to talk about things a publisher can do for you as opposed to self-publishing. Editors provide guidance about market trends. They help guide careers. They do title and cover brainstorming. They discuss pricing strategies and author branding. They partner with retailers to do special promotions for titles. They coordinate all aspects of your book’s publication.

The publicity team at Grand Central arranges blog tours for authors and sends out galleys – both print and e – for review. They send out newsletters to promote their authors. They collaborate with editorial to plan promo for titles. They do social media promotion and try to help authors do their own social media promotion, in addition to Grand Central’s efforts.

Finally, the editors talked a little about what they’re particularly looking for:

Michelle says she’s always looking for a rock star hero. She’d love a great highlander romance, a western. She does a lot of historicals and a lot of contemporary romance. She looks for a strong voice and arresting characters.

Leah answered for some of the other editors : Alex Logan loves romantic suspense and small-town contemporary romance.

Associate Editor Lauren Plude loves history. Give her historical romances, especially Scottish. She also really likes single title contemporary romance.

Associate Editor Megha Parekh specializes in New Adult. She also works on a lot of erotic romance.

Leah is looking for “band of brothers” type stories – sports teams, military or cops. She loves the ‘behind the scenes banter’ among the men.

You can find the Forever Yours submission guidelines here.

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I have a new author page on Facebook. Like it to keep up with the latest on my writing.

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East of the Web is looking for short stories for children ages 5-12. East of the Web publishes the stories online, as well as making them available through their Short Story e-reader ap. They accept both new and previously published submissions and pay five cents a word, up to $200. The editors have not set a word length for stories, though they stress they want short stories, not book manuscripts. They’re open to all genres of stories for children. Find their guidelines here.

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As always, feel free to share the information in this newsletter with others — repost, reprint, retweet, etc. Please give me credit as the source, and include a link to the blog. If you want to know more about me and my books, visit my websites Here or Here.

 

 

“A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?” George Orwell

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This week I continue my look at the publisher spotlights from the Romance Writers of America annual conference in San Antonio, Texas, with a look at the Spotlight on Ballantine Bantam Dell

Editor Sue Grimshaw and Executive Editor Shauna Summers presented the Spotlight on Ballatine Bantam Dell. Ballantine Bantam Dell is a divison of Random House Group, which is a division of Penguin Random House – the larger publisher in the world. They publish all types of fiction in all formats – hard cover, trade paper, mass market paper and electronic editions.

The majority of their workshop was spent showing covers of the books they published and talking about the authors and stories. Reading these books will give writers an idea of the types of storylines and writing Ballantine Bantam Dell is interested in.

“Our sweet spot is franchise authors and one of the things we do well is build an author’s brand,” Shauna said. “We see ourselves as a full service publisher in that way.” They publish authors such as Janet Evanovich, Diana Gabaldon, Debbie Macomber. Danielle Steele, Jude Devereaux, Stephanie Bond, Karen Marie Moning, and Julie Kenner.

Sue Grimshaw talked about Loveswept, their digital imprint. They relaunched the Loveswept brand in 2011 to include reprints of original Loveswept titles, as well as original romance novels and novellas. They publish historical, contemporary, paranormal romance, romantic suspense, erotic romance under the Loveswept imprint. Flirt publishes New Adult stories for college aged readers.  Many of the books have been New York Times bestsellers. They’re looking for books with which readers will forge an emotional connection. They publish six to eight new titles per month.

Loveswept pays quarterly royalties. Most authors earn out their advance in the first two months.  Loveswept and Flirt accept both agented and unagented manuscripts. You can find the guidelines for Loveswept and Flirt here.   Manuscripts can be 15,000 to 30,000 words for novellas and 40,000 to 60,000 words for novels.

In Ballantine Bantam Dell, they publish two to three print romances a month.

Ballantine Bantam Dell wants agented manuscripts.

Shauna mentioned she’s looking for sports books – soccer, football, hockey, baseball, etc. She also loves contemporary western stories with cowboys.

All authors at Bantam Ballantine Dell, whether in print or digital, have a dedicated publicity team and a dedicated promotion team. They do lots of online promotions with Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other social media platforms. They do blog tours, reader events, and are always coming up with new ways to promote titles.

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Less Than Three Press is a small publisher of novels and novellas focusing on LGBTQ characters. They are seeking stories for a Villain anthology to be edited by senior editor Tan-ni Fan. Titled Villains, Inc. the anthology will feature gay, lesbian and trans romance stories in an sub-genre. Stories should be between 10,000 and 20,000 words. Payment is $200. The deadline for submissions is December 31. For more information, go here.

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Cleis Press is seeking submissions for an upcoming erotic romance anthology, Rogue Hearts, to be edited by romance author Delilah Devlin. Delilah is looking for stories that feature “rogues with a heart of gold.” Stories should be between 2500 and 5000 words. Payment is $50 and the deadline for submisssion is September 15, 2014. Find all the details here. 

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Pelican Book Group is seeking submissions of inspirational romance novellas for its Harbourlight Imprint. Pelican will publish three novellas for its Easter Lilies series, to be released at Easter in 2015. Stories should be between 15,000 and 25,000 words, and  may be historical or contemporary romance. The heroes and heroines should be between ages 25 and 35, and Easter Lily symbolism must play a role in the story. In addition, each story must use as its basis the scripture verse Solomon 2:14. The deadline for submissions is September 30, 2014. For all the details, go here.

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I have a new Facebook Author Page. If you want to keep up with news about  my books, speaking engagements, workshops, etc. please like the page at https://www.facebook.com/CindyMyersauthor or click here. Thanks!

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As always, feel free to share the information in this newsletter with others — repost, reprint, retweet, etc. Please give me credit as the source, and include a link to the blog. If you want to know more about me and my books, visit my websites Here or Here.

 

 

“Writers write about what obsesses them. You draw those cards. I lost my mother when I was 14. My daughter died at the age of 6. I lost my faith as a Catholic. When I’m writing, the darkness is always there. I go where the pain is.”  Anne Rice

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This week I continue my recap of Publisher Spotlights from the Romance Writers of America annual convention with a look at Pocket Books. Executive Editor Lauren McKenna and Senior Editor Micki Nuding presented the spotlight. Pocket publishes romance in all formats — mass market paper, trade paper, hardback and digital. The Pocket Star imprint is their digital first imprint. Pocket Star is open to a wide variety of stories, including cross-genre books and books that don’t fit into an easily defineable niche. This is the place for “books we can take a risk on.” Pocket Star is open to manuscripts from 60,000 to 100,000 words.

The editors spent a little time talking about the types of manuscripts that do best at Pocket. Erotica remains popular and they’re always looking for more erotica and erotic romance. Urban fantasy is not as popular as it once was and the market for historical romance has slowed, although they are still open to Regency, Victorian and Scottish historical romance, and romance set in the American West with cowboys.

Micki Nuding likes historical romance in particular, and she loves books with humor. She gravitates toward “alpha heroes, fierce conflict, strong heroines.”

Lauren McKenna says she likes anything that is “dark, weird, twisted or strange.” She wants books with strong emotion. “If you can make me cry, I’ll back it,” she says. She likes strong heroes and snarky heroines, loves animals, but isn’t so crazy about books with kids. She would love to see “a thriller about a virus in a submarine.”

Pocket also publishes women’s fiction in their Gallery imprint. Here, they like to push the boundaries, with issue-oriented books and bigger, sweeping romances, both historical and contemporary.

They closed the session by talking about the importance of self-promotion for authors. They suggest starting even before you are published to develop a relationship with bloggers and online communities. When you are published, tweet quotes from you book, or pictures with quotes attached that other people will share.

Pocket only accepts agented manuscripts. You can read more about other editors at Pocket, and their interests, here.

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Author Cynthia Ward will be editing a Weird Western Anthology, to be published by WolfSinger Publications. She’s looking for stories set on the western frontier that feature people of color, Native Americans, GLBTQ characters, women, other minorities, and all the people who helped settle the west, but who were never the stars of movies and books in the past. She’s looking for stories between 1,000 and 10,000 words. Payment is $5 per story, plus a share of royalties from the anthology. She will open for submissions December 1, 2014 and close on December 31, 2014. Do not submit before December 1. She has detailed guidelines detailing the types of stories she’d like to see — and things she doesn’t want to see, so be sure to check them out here. 

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DAW Books, an imprint of the Penguin Group Publishers devoted to science fiction and fantasy, accepts submissions from both agented and unagented authors. They accept submissions of manuscripts 80,000 words and up. They only accept submissions via snail mail, and request a three-month exclusive period to review your work. Find all the guidelines here. 

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I have a new Facebook Author Page. If you’d like to keep up with my book news, please like my page at http://www.facebook.com/CindyMyersauthor

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As always, feel free to share the information in this blog with others. Reprint, repost, retweet, etc. Please give me credit as the source, and include a link to this blog. If you’d like to find out more about me, visit my websites here or here.